Personal History & Archives Blog

History is written based on what is saved.  What are YOU saving?

Why I Do Family History: how it supports women’s history

Why I Do Family History: how it supports women’s history

As women, we  mostly have been raised in cultures that valued modesty and humility, and discouraged pride and self-celebration. For women.

So most women shy away from feeling “worthy” of being included in history and placing the evidence of their lives in archives.

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There’s history in those family photos!

There’s history in those family photos!

Originally published by BORN TO RISE. Based on a family camping trip photo, a state endangered species committee tracked the shrinking presence of a local plant and moved it onto the endangered species list to protect it from extinction. Many family photos do have dramatic stories wrapped up in them. But the only way to capture, tell, and act on historic visual information is to save our photos…and preserve them.

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Women’s Lived Experience Matters

Women’s Lived Experience Matters

What historical events, policies, and overall political changes have you lived through? What do you find yourself talking to young folks about? I was a Kelly Girl back in the early 80s.  For a...

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Family and Women’s History for Kids: a shocking first date!

Family and Women’s History for Kids: a shocking first date!

Family history gives kids a foothold in history.  Kids see their role within a larger context, and learn the value of their actions and contributions. “Once upon a time there was a farm girl — the youngest of six kids.  She was shy and thought she was ugly.  She had some very glamorous older sisters and some very rowdy older brothers. They all lived in Aroostook County, Maine.

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Preemie on stage: Amanda Gorman

Preemie on stage: Amanda Gorman

Like so many who heard her, I was blown away by Amanda Gorman. And the next morning she. was. everywhere. And I'm thrilled for her--and us!  In my own kid-related corners of the interwebs, I read...

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About Me

I spent 18 years as “archivist and senior research scholar” at an academic science library, actively trying to add women to the historical record and looking for the women who were already included almost accidentally. I have degrees in women’s history and cultural theory — the latter means that I see the cultural value of everyday practices such as food, clothing, hobbies, and domestic arrangements. Non-famous people matter.